Is the Car Seat Test Still Alive And Well?

It has been almost a year since the CPS released the new statement on car seat testing prior to discharge.  As both the author and a person with a personal bias I am deeply curious what impact the change in position has had on the community out there.  My question to you the reader is whether the statement had any influence on your local practice.  Now if you are in the US I know the answer already should be a resounding no as you are still likely to follow the recommendation of the AAP.  What about the rest and in particular those that read the CPS guidelines.

In 2017 is the test still relevant?

 

Original post below…

The day has finally come that the CPS has released a new statement on Infant Car Seat Testing.  While I am the author of the statement and this may sound like self promotion, I am putting it here as there are many followers across Canada and elsewhere who may see this change in position here but not through the CPS distribution network.

This is an important statement not because I wrote it but due to the state of testing in Canada.  Through personal communications it is apparent that the test has fallen out of favour in some jurisdictions in Canada while others have been steadfast in a pass of the test as a criterion for discharge.

As you will see, the Fetus and Newborn Committee have created a clear recommendation on this test which represents a significant departure from the previous position.

How will your centre respond to this change?  I would welcome feedback on this from readers and am interested to see if the AAP will follow suit sometime in the future.

For the complete statement please see:

Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks’ gestational age)

For a link to the rest of the Fetus and Newborn Statements please click here.

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2 thoughts on “Is the Car Seat Test Still Alive And Well?

  1. I am all for questioning actual policies that “hang around” in the NICU community without a proven test of multi center, randomized, controlled prospective study. Furthermore, the results to be corroborated with a following study.
    Infants less than 37 weeks gestation at birth have multitude of immature systems that predispose them to complications. I am not sure if this change in policy is not a maneuver to save costs. I am concern when infants failed the “car seat test,” not just to avoid car rides but I think could be a sign that airways protection has not being stablished yet. Subjecting an infant to higher changes of apnea and desaturation in a non controlled environment scare me and for me it is not worth the risk for early discharge home.

    Like

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